Have you ever seen a Mountain Lion where they 'don't exist'?

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Postby chief joe » Fri Feb 15, 2008 12:03 pm

Central USA sees mountain lion migrations

[size=150][color=darkred]SIOUX FALLS, S.D.
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Postby swampbuck » Mon Mar 31, 2008 11:53 pm

Have you ever seen a Mountain Lion where they 'don't exist'?


Other then in a zoo or wild animal nope!
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Postby paddlenut » Wed Apr 02, 2008 1:42 am

that was pretty funny Todd.
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Postby Todd » Tue Nov 18, 2008 8:36 pm

Cougar Killed in Troup County
Fort Valley, Ga. (11/18/2008)



Hunters around West Point Lake might be led to believe that Georgia has a new predator roaming the woods
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Postby Todd » Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:52 pm

Slain mountain lion to undergo DNA testing

Animal was killed Sunday in residential area of Bossier City.

By Jimmy Watson
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Postby Todd » Tue Jan 13, 2009 6:46 pm

DEPARTMENT OFFERS ONLINE COUGAR EDUCATION, IDENTIFICATION COURSE

SANTA FE -- The Department of Game and Fish is offering an online Cougar Education and Identification Course and an accompanying quiz to encourage hunters, guides and houndsmen to help ensure that cougar hunting is an activity they can continue to enjoy.

The online course focuses on how to distinguish male, female and sub-adult cougars, and also includes information about cougar habitat, behavior, hunting rules, human-cougar issues, and state management objectives. The course and accompanying online exam was developed by the Colorado Division of Wildlife, which requires all cougar hunters to have passed the exam before legally hunting cougars in the state.

The Department is asking hunters, guides, outfitters and houndsmen to:

Contact the Department toll-free, (877) 950-5466 or visit www.wildlife.state.nm.us to learn about management goals, the number of cougars allowed to be harvested, and the female subharvest limit before hunting in any Game Management Unit or Zone.
Take plenty of time to determine a cougar's gender and make an informed choice before harvesting the animal.
The online course, interactive quiz and more information about cougar hunting in New Mexico can be found on the Department Web site, www.wildlife.state.nm.us . Information also is available by calling toll-free, (800) 862-9310.
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Postby Todd » Tue Oct 20, 2009 6:22 pm

HUNTER PHOTOGRAPHS MOUNTAIN LION IN NORTHWEST KANSAS
Mountain Lion

First official documentation of live wild mountain lion in state
WAKEENEY
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Michigan Officials verify cougar sighting in eastern U.P.

Postby Todd » Thu Nov 05, 2009 2:06 pm

DNR Verifies Cougar Tracks, Confirms Location of Trail Camera Photo in Eastern Upper Peninsula

Nov. 4, 2009

The Department of Natural Resources today announced it has verified two sets of cougar tracks and confirmed the location of a cougar photo in the eastern Upper Peninsula. The tracks were discovered in the DeTour and Gulliver areas, while the photo was taken near Bruce Township.

On Oct. 26, DNR Wildlife Biologist Dave Jentoft received a call late in the day at the Shingleton Field Office reporting tracks that looked like cougar prints near DeTour. The caller was instructed to cover the tracks to protect them from the elements, and Jentoft was able to respond the next day to take photographs, measure the tracks and conduct a field investigation. The information Jentoft collected was shared with the DNR's trained cougar team, and the consensus was reached that the tracks appear to have been made by a cougar.

On Nov. 2, DNR Wildlife Biologist Terry Minzey was contacted by a private landowner near Gulliver who reported finding large tracks that he thought may be from a cougar. DNR biologists Kristie Sitar and Kevin Swanson investigated the site with Minzey, taking measurements, photos and plaster casts of the tracks. In conjunction with the DNR's specially trained cougar team, it was determined that the tracks are from a cougar.

"These are the first confirmed cougar tracks in the eastern Upper Peninsula, and we appreciate the cooperation of the callers who reported the tracks and worked to keep them covered until we could respond to the scene," said Sitar, who is a member of the DNR's cougar team. "Other landowners who believe they have evidence of a cougar on their property, such as tracks or a kill site, are encouraged to contact their local DNR field office as soon as possible, which allows staff to investigate before the evidence is compromised. Without good evidence, like what we had in these two cases, verification becomes increasingly difficult."

The cougar photograph, taken by a trail camera on private property near Bruce Township in mid-October, has been under investigation by wildlife staff since Oct. 22. The photo shows a cougar at night walking through a food plot. Though there was no doubt the photo depicted a cougar, the location where the photo was taken was not accessible to DNR staff for on-site inspection until Nov. 2. At that time, a field investigation by Jentoft and DNR Wildlife Technician Tim Maples made it possible to verify the location by comparing camera angles and vegetation markers at the site, allowing wildlife officials to confirm the photo was taken at that spot.

Cougars, also known as mountain lions, originally were native to Michigan but were thought to have been extirpated around the turn of the last century. The last known wild cougar taken in Michigan was killed near Newberry in 1906. However, sightings are regularly reported and although verification is often difficult, the DNR was able to verify several sets of cougar tracks in Marquette and Delta counties in 2008.

Established cougar populations are found as close to Michigan as North and South Dakota, and transient cougars dispersing from these areas have been known to travel hundreds of miles in search of new territory. Characteristic evidence of cougars include tracks, which are about three inches long by three and a half inches wide and typically show no claw marks, or suspicious kill sites, such as deer carcasses that are largely intact and have been buried with sticks and debris.

Reports of cougar tracks and other evidence should be made to a local DNR office or by calling the department's 24-hour Report All Poaching line at 800-292-7800. If a citizen comes into contact with a cougar, the following behavior is recommended:

* Stop, stand tall, pick up small children and do not run. A cougar's instinct is to chase.
* Do not approach the animal.
* Try to appear larger than the cougar. Never take your eyes off the animal or turn your back. Do not crouch down or try to hide.
* If the animal displays aggressive behavior, shout, wave your arms and throw rocks. The idea is to convince the cougar that you are not prey, but a potential danger.
* If a cougar attacks, fight back aggressively and try to stay on your feet. Do not play dead. Cougars have been driven away by people who have fought back.

Cougars are classified as an endangered species in Michigan. It is unlawful to kill, harass or otherwise harm a cougar except in the immediate defense of human life. For more information about the recent cougar tracks and photo, call Sitar at (906) 293-5131. To learn more about cougars and how to identify their tracks, go online to www.michigan.gov/dnrcougars .
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Hunter kills cougar in Iowa

Postby Todd » Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:49 pm

Hunter kills cougar in Iowa

By Bob Eschliman
WORLD-HERALD NEWS SERVICE


MARENGO, Iowa -- A Cedar Rapids man has done what few hunters in Iowa have been able to do in more than a century.

Raymond Goebel Jr. shot a mountain lion to death. It was the fifth confirmed sighting in the past decade.

Ron Andrews, furbearer biologist with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, has received many calls about potential mountain lion sightings in the last few years. He said such reports often turn out to be sightings of other animals: bobcats, yellow-colored dogs and deer.

More than 1,000 mountain lions have been reported to department personnel in the past 10 years; Andrews said he gets two or three such reports each month. Goebel's sighting near Marengo is expected to cause a spike in reports in the local area.
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But most cougar reports lack substantial evidence to back them up, such as a photo or video of the animal, a photo of its track, an animal dropping, or some sort of DNA evidence. Since 2000,

only four mountain lions have been killed by hunters in Iowa.

"This is the first confirmed sighting in Iowa in more than five years, and the fourth mountain lion killed in Iowa," Andrews said. "Mountain lions have no protection in Iowa, and while the Iowa DNR does not encourage people killing a lion they come across, it is not against the law."

Goebel was hunting Monday with a group of friends near Marengo in eastern Iowa, about 35 miles southwest of Cedar Rapids.

While he was watching for deer, he said, something caught his eye over his left shoulder.

"I looked through the scope of my gun and couldn't believe it," he said. "It was what I thought it was, though."

A few minutes later, he waved over one of his hunting buddies. Goebel showed him the 125-pound male lion in a tree roughly 15 yards away. The hunters discussed the legality of killing the cougar and got permission from the property owner to shoot the cat.

Mountain lions can be shot legally as long as legal methods are used. Like black bears, cougars are not listed in Iowa law as designated wildlife species because they were considered extinct when the state's current fish and game legislation was first crafted.

Two efforts to have mountain lions and black bears designated as wildlife species have failed in the Iowa Legislature.

Goebel said he plans to have the mountain lion's full body mounted. The Department of Natural Resources will investigate the stomach contents and take tissue and blood samples for DNA analysis.

Although state laws do not list mountain lions as designated wildlife, the department wants reports of all killed mountain lions.

"It is important that the DNR obtain as much information as possible to further manage the possible presence of mountain lions in the state," state furbearer biologist Andrews said. "It is very valuable to the DNR to collect scientific data from any dead mountain lion that turns up in the state."

www.omaha.com/article/20091216/SPORTS07 ... 1/sports07
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Wisconsin Cougar

Postby Todd » Wed Dec 23, 2009 3:36 pm

Cougar image caught on trail camera in Dunn County, Wisconsin

By Andy Rathbun

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A cougar has been caught on camera in Dunn County, Wis.

It's likely the same animal that left tracks last week along farmland in the village of Spring Valley, Wis., officials said. A trail camera captured a photo of the big cat Saturday night as it was walking southwest of Downsville, Wis.

On Monday, it was discovered that the cougar had killed a buck fawn. The fawn was found about 100 yards from where the photo was taken, said Jess Carstens, wildlife biologist for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources office in Menomonie.

The partially eaten fawn had been covered with cornstalks, Carstens said, calling that a common way for cougars to hide their kills. The cougar returned to the carcass for leftovers at some point, and fresh tracks were observed Tuesday.

Carstens estimated the fawn weighed 90 to 100 pounds. The spot where the kill was found is the cougar's last known location, Carstens said.

The DNR will monitor the kill site to see if the cougar returns, said Ed Culhane, a DNR spokesperson.

The cougar appears to be moving southeast at a rate of five to seven miles per day, officials said.

Last Wednesday, a farmer in Spring Valley spotted what he believed were cougar tracks. It was confirmed Friday that the tracks belonged to a cougar, and hair samples from the site were collected for testing, said Harvey Halvorson, a wildlife biologist for the DNR.

It's not clear whether the cougar in Wisconsin is the same animal seen crossing through the Twin Cities' northern suburbs earlier this month, Halvorson said. That animal was last spotted Dec. 11 in Stillwater.

Officials have said the recent cougar tracks in Minnesota and Wisconsin appear to be similar in size.

The DNR has no immediate plans to capture the animal, Culhane said in a statement. Landowners in the area are being asked to report any signs of the animal to the department.

Though confirmed reports of cougars in the area are rare, cougar tracks were found in May in Pepin County and one was seen in March near Spooner, Wisconsin.

Cougars are protected animals in Wisconsin. It's illegal to kill them except to protect a human from injury. Cougars typically avoid humans, and the risk of one attacking someone is small, officials say.

For more information on how to report cougar sightings, visit http://dnr.wi.gov/org/land/er/ mammals/cougar/sightings.htm .

Here is a picture of the corn stalk covered deer killed by the cougar
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