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Mountain Lion Shot Near Marengo, Iowa

Postby Todd » Mon Dec 28, 2009 3:48 pm

Mountain Lion Shot Near Marengo, Iowa

Posted: December 15, 2009

DES MOINES - A mountain lion was shot near Marengo, Monday afternoon, by a deer hunter participating in Iowa's second shotgun season.

Raymond Goebel, Jr., of Cedar Rapids, was hunting with a group, 4 miles southwest of Marengo. The group had decided to sit around 3:30 p.m., and watch for deer on the move. Goebel looked over his left shoulder and something caught his eye about 15 yards up in a tree. He looked through the scope on his gun and couldn't believe what he was seeing.

"It is what I thought it is," Goebel said.

About 30 minutes passed when another hunter in the group a short distance away stood up. Goebel waved him over and pointed to the figure in the tree. After discussions about the legality of shooting it and gaining approval from the landowner, Goebel shot the cat.

Brad Baker, state conservation officer with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, said the mountain lion weighed about 125 pounds, and although originally thought to be a female, biologists later confirmed that it was a male. Baker said the condition of the teeth and claws and the lack of markings from ear tags lead him to the conclusion.

Ron Andrews, state furbearer biologist with the Iowa DNR, said all other lions confirmed in Iowa were young males as was this one.

This is the first confirmed sighting in Iowa in more than five years, and the fourth mountain lion killed in Iowa. Mountain lions have no protection in Iowa and while the Iowa DNR does not encourage people killing a lion they come across, it is not against the law.

There had been reports of a mountain lion in the Tama area that Andrews investigated and he said the evidence did not point to a mountain lion, but it was difficult to find because the investigation occurred in the summer. Andrews receives two to three reports of mountain lion sightings per month from across Iowa, but finding confirming evidence is difficult.

These animals in the Midwest travel great distances in a short time looking for other cougars, he said. "They are not here in great numbers," Andrews said. "But this shooting will likely prompt many additional unconfirmed sightings. Our experience investigating these reports has found that more than 90 percent are mistaken identity for bobcats, yellow-colored dogs or deer, which are the same color as mountain lions."

Goebel said he plans to have a full body mount of the mountain lion. The DNR will receive the stomach contents, and tissue and blood samples for DNA analysis.
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Postby Todd » Mon May 10, 2010 12:06 pm

Mountain lion confirmed in rural Greene County, Indiana

A mountain lion has been confirmed in a rural part of Greene County east of Bloomfield as a result of a new Department of Natural Resources policy designed to systematically collect data and evaluate reported sightings of such animals.

A mountain lion's presence was verified by Scott Johnson, the DNR's non-game mammal biologist and member of the DNR Division of Fish and Wildlife's team that assists in reviewing reports having credible evidence.

Johnson made the determination from photographs taken by motion-sensitive game cameras placed in the area after a preliminary investigation found evidence consistent with mountain lion behavior, including an eviscerated deer carcass buried under a pile of leaves.

The cameras were set on April 30, and multiple images of a mountain lion were captured at approximately 2:30 a.m. on May 1.

Johnson was contacted after a conservation officer from the DNR Division of Law Enforcement received a call from a citizen. Conservations officers helped Johnson set the trail cameras and have been informing local residents of the mountain lion's presence.

Mountain lions are known by many names, including cougar, puma, catamount and panther. Historically, mountain lions (Puma concolor) lived in most of the eastern United States, including Indiana. Different published reports cite the last documented case of a wild mountain lion in Indiana as somewhere between 1850 and 1865.

The chance of encountering a mountain lion today in Indiana is almost non-existent, but people should be alert to their surroundings. If an encounter does happen, the MLRT points to advice from authorities in Western states, where mountain lions are more common:

* Do not approach a mountain lion. Give it a way to escape.
* Do not run from a mountain lion. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact.
* Do not crouch or bend over. Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms, open your jacket or shirt. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
* Hold children and pets near you.
* Fight back if attacked using big sticks, stones, or any other available items.

"One thing to point out is mountain lions are not stalkers," said Gary Langell, the DNR's private lands program manager and developer of the mountain lion policy. "They don't stalk prey. They tend to pick an active game trail, like a deer trail, and wait for a deer to come by. That's typically why you don't see livestock kills from mountain lions. They lay in wait rather than stalk."

The purpose of the policy is to develop a consistent procedure to investigate reported sightings and to institute a formal data collection and storage system.

"The objective is to keep the public abreast of all developments regarding mountain lions in Indiana based on the best available scientific information," Langell said. "More than anything, it was prompted by increased reports of mountain lions migrating east, specifically out of South Dakota. Of course, there have been a couple reports from Michigan, and one in Chicago. At that point, it becomes more apparent we could have mountain lions show up in Indiana."

Without additional evidence, Langell said it's impossible to say if the mountain lion photographed in Greene County is wild or is a formerly captive cat.

The DNR occasionally receives reports of mountain lion sightings around the state, but typically the evidence has turned out to be something other than a mountain lion, has been inconclusive, or has proved to be part of an Internet hoax.

Since the policy's inception March 1, 19 mountain lion sightings have been reported. The report in Greene County is the only one confirmed to be a mountain lion.

Langell said two reports were confirmed by biologists as animals other than a mountain lion. Sixteen were designated as "unconfirmed" either because of no physical evidence or because photographs provided were of insufficient quality to identify characteristics of any animal type.

Prior to implementing the policy, a DNR biologist investigated and confirmed in late 2009 a mountain lion in Clay County based on evidence submitted by a hunter who had taken photographs from an elevated hunting stand. Another biologist investigated a report near Idaville in White County in December, but evidence was inconclusive.

Mountain lions are a protected species in Indiana, but state law allows a resident landowner or tenant to kill a mountain lion while it is causing damage to property owned or leased by the landowner/tenant. If the landowner/tenant wishes to have someone else take the mountain lion, that person is required to secure a permit from the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife.

http://www.in.gov/portal/news_events/53876.htm
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Postby chief joe » Fri May 28, 2010 10:19 pm

Mountain lion prowls Brown County

GEORGETOWN, Ohio -- Authorities say a mountain lion is on the loose in southern Ohio.

After receiving at least two calls yesterday morning about the animal, the Brown County sheriff's office learned a resident bought a mountain lion at a flea market and it had gotten away about a month ago.

Authorities say one woman saw the animal through binoculars and another caller reported a loud growling noise near a landfill some 40 miles east of Cincinnati.

Experts say attacks on humans are rare but possible by mountain lions, also called cougars, pumas or other names. They will go after pets and are fast and agile.
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Kansas Mountain Lion

Postby Todd » Wed Jun 30, 2010 4:38 pm

Biologists tracked mountain lion this spring in western Kansas
BY MICHAEL PEARCE
The Wichita Eagle

HERINGTON, Kan. | A mountain lion from Colorado took a quick stroll through Kansas this spring, basically covering the state from north to south in March.

It is the third confirmed mountain lion in Kansas in the past 106 years, and all three instances have occurred since 2007.

One was shot in Barber County in 2007 and the other was photographed by an archery deer hunter in Trego County last fall.

Thursday in Herington, Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks biologist Matt Peek told the Wildlife and Parks Commission about the third mountain lion.

The young male, weighing about 90 pounds, had been trapped and collared by Colorado game officials and released near Estes Park on Oct. 20 of last year.

The cat's GPS-collar transmits its location every three hours. Biologists download the information about once a month.

Peek said Colorado authorities alerted Wildlife and Parks officials here when it appeared the cat was headed into Kansas. Wildlife and Parks officials didn't know the cat's location when it was in the state.

Several biologists, including Peek, later checked sites where several GPS coordinates were transmitted from a small area in western Kansas.

Peek said while the mountain lion spent some time along river bottoms, it spent much of its time trekking southward across agricultural and ranching areas with little traditional wildlife habitat. The cats are known to be reclusive and contact with humans is rare.

It appears the cat entered Kansas in Cheyenne County
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Mountain Lion in Indiana

Postby Todd » Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:51 pm

Crane Issues Indiana Mountain Lion Warning
4 People Say They've Seen Big Cat

POSTED: 8:17 am EDT September 24, 2010
UPDATED: 11:35 am EDT September 24, 2010

CRANE, Ind. -- The Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center in southwestern Indiana has warned workers to watch out for a suspected mountain lion that has been spotted in the area.

Crane officials said that four people have made unconfirmed sightings of a possible mountain lion since Aug. 5 on or near the base about 25 miles southwest of Bloomington.

The state Department of Natural Resources confirmed instances of a mountain lion in nearby Greene and Clay counties in the past year.

In that incident, a motion-sensitive game camera caught a picture of the huge cat.

Those were the first confirmations of the animals in the state since the 1860s.

Biologists said male mountain lions can weigh up to 150 pounds and females about 90 pounds.

DNR spokesman Phil Bloom said earlier this year that people should not try to approach, corner or run from a mountain lion.

Instead, the DNR urges people to stand and face and animal, make eye contact and try to appear as large as possible. If confronted by a mountain lion, a person should wave their arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice, Bloom said.

Mountain lions are a protected species in Indiana, but state law allows a resident landowner or tenant to kill a mountain lion while it is causing damage to property.

http://www.theindychannel.com/news/25142280/detail.html
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Postby Todd » Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:45 pm

Deputy spots mountain lion along S. Indiana highway

9:18 a.m. EDT,
November 1, 2010

BEDFORD, Indiana (AP)
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Kansas Confirms Mountain Lion In Nemaha County

Postby Todd » Wed Dec 22, 2010 2:50 pm

KDWP CONFIRMS MOUNTAIN LION IN NEMAHA COUNTY

Photo of lion taken by deer hunter
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Missouri Farmer Kills Mountain Lion

Postby Todd » Fri Jan 07, 2011 1:14 am

Ray County Missouri Cattleman Kills Mountain Lion

Published on: Jan. 3, 2011


COLUMBIA
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Postby Todd » Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:58 am

Hunter admits he shot mountain lion; no charges to be filed

News-Leader staff
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Confirmed Mountain In St. Louis County

Postby Todd » Sat Jan 22, 2011 2:01 pm

Chesterfield sighting confirmed to be a mountain lion

Published on: Jan. 20, 2011

Posted by Joe Jerek
http://mdc.mo.gov/newsroom/

JEFFERSON CITY Mo
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Hunters shoot 2nd Mountain Lion In Missouri

Postby Todd » Wed Jan 26, 2011 6:24 am

Hunters shoot mountain lion near Macon

Published on: Jan. 23, 2011

Posted by Joe Jerek

KIRKSVILLE Mo
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Another Missouri Mountain Lion

Postby Todd » Mon Feb 21, 2011 10:37 pm

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Linn County sighting confirmed to be a mountain lion

JEFFERSON CITY Mo
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Louisiana Verifies Cougar Sighting in Vernon Parish

Postby Todd » Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:14 pm

Louisiana DWF Verifies Cougar Sighting in Vernon Parish

Aug. 29, 2011-- The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has received photographic evidence of the presence of a cougar in Vernon Parish.

A private citizen sent LDWF a trail camera picture taken Aug. 13, 2011. LDWF Large Carnivore Program Manager Maria Davidson and biologist Brandon Wear conducted a site investigation that confirmed the authenticity of the photograph.

“It is quite possible for this animal to be captured on other trail cameras placed at deer bait sites,” Davidson said. “Deer are the primary prey item for cougars; therefore, they are drawn to areas where deer congregate.”

It is unlikely this cougar will remain in any one area longer than it would take to consume a kill. Cougars do not prefer to eat spoiled meat and will move on as soon as the Louisiana heat and humidity take its toll on the kill.

“It is impossible to determine if the animal in the photograph is a wild, free-ranging cougar, or an escaped captive," Davidson added. “Although it is illegal to own a cougar in Louisiana, it is possible that there are some illegally held ’pets’ in the state.”

LDWF has documented several occurrences since 2002. The first cougar sighting was in 2002 by an employee at Lake Fausse Point State Park. That sighting was later confirmed with DNA analysis from scat found at the site. Three trail camera photos were taken of a cougar in Winn, Vernon and Allen parishes in 2008. Subsequently on Nov. 30, 2008, a cougar was shot and killed in a neighborhood by Bossier City Police Department.

The mountain lion, cougar, panther or puma are names that all refer to the same animal. Their color ranges from lighter tan to brownish grey. The only species of big cats that occur as black are the jaguar and leopard. Jaguars are native to South America and leopards are native to Africa. Both species can occur as spotted or black, although in both cases the spotted variety is much more common. Although LDWF receives numerous calls about black panthers, there has never been a documented case of a black cougar anywhere in North America.

The vast majority of these reports received by LDWF cannot be verified due to the very nature of a sighting. Many of the calls are determined to be cases of mistaken identity, with dog tracks making up the majority of the evidence submitted by those reporting cougar sightings. Other animals commonly mistaken for cougars are bobcats and house cats, usually seen from a distance or in varying shades of light.

The significant lack of physical evidence indicates that Louisiana does not have an established, breeding population of cougars. In states that have verified small populations of cougars, physical evidence can readily be found in the form of tracks, cached deer kills, scat and road kills.

The recent sightingsof cougars in Louisiana are believed to be young animals dispersing from existing populations. An expanding population in Texas can produce dispersing individual cougars that move into suitable habitat in Louisiana. Young males are known to disperse from their birthplace and travel hundreds of miles seeking their own territories.

Cougars that occur in Louisiana are protected under state and federal law. Penalties for taking a cougar in Louisiana may include up to one year in jail and/or a $100,000 fine. Anyone with any information regarding the taking of a cougar should call the Operation Game Thief hotline at 1-800-442-2511. Callers may remain anonymous and may receive a cash reward.

To report verifiable sightings of cougars with physical evidence such as photos, tracks and/or scat, please call your nearest LDWF Field Office at:

Minden 318-371-3050

Monroe 318-343-4044

Pineville 318-487-5885

Lake Charles 337-491-2575

Opelousas 337-948-0255

Hammond 985-543-4779

For more information, please contact Maria Davidson at 225-931-3061 or mdavidson@wlf.la.gov .
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Michigan DNR Confirms Cougar in Houghton and Keweenaw Counti

Postby Todd » Thu Dec 01, 2011 3:31 am

Michigan DNR Confirms Cougar in Houghton and Keweenaw Counties

Agency: Natural Resources

Nov. 30, 2011

The Department of Natural Resources recently confirmed the presence of a radio-collared cougar just north of the city of Hancock in northern Houghton County. The animal was captured on a trail camera on Nov. 13, walking directly in front of the camera, with the noticeable presence of a radio collar.

DNR Wildlife Division staff visited the property on Nov. 17 where the trail camera is mounted and verified the location of the camera. Property owner Jesse Chynoweth submitted the pictures to the DNR for confirmation.

"This is the third time this animal has been captured on trail cameras in the Upper Peninsula," said Adam Bump, a wildlife biologist with the DNR's Cougar Team. "The Wisconsin DNR earlier verified two trail camera pictures of this cat as it passed through Wisconsin on its way to the UP."

The Department has also verified a set of tracks from a cougar in southern Keweenaw County on Nov. 20. The cougar passed about 30 feet from a deer hunter who later returned to the area with a friend to snap pictures of the cougar's tracks. The animal is almost certainly the same, radio-collared cougar that was photographed about 15 miles south near Hancock a week earlier.

The DNR is still in the process of tracking down where the cougar is from and has been checking frequencies from collars of cats from South Dakota, Utah and Montana. Only western states currently have cougars collared for research projects, so the animal likely traveled a great distance to reach the Upper Peninsula.

The Department will inform the public if more details are discovered about this cougar.

Cougars, also known as mountain lions, were once found throughout North America, including Michigan. Habitat loss and heavy persecution led to cougars being eliminated from Michigan in the early 1900s. The last known wild cougar taken in Michigan was killed near Newberry in 1906. Although sightings have increased and are regularly reported in the Upper Peninsula, verification is often difficult. Cougar tracks and a cougar photo from in the eastern Upper Peninsula were verified in 2009. Additionally, the DNR was able to verify several sets of cougar tracks in Marquette and Delta counties in 2008. The radio collared cougar has been photographed in Houghton and Ontonagon counties in 2011.

Established cougar populations are found as close to Michigan as North and South Dakota, and transient cougars dispersing from these areas have been known to travel hundreds of miles in search of new territory. Characteristic evidence of cougars include tracks, which are about three inches long by three and a half inches wide and typically show no claw marks, or suspicious kill sites, such as deer carcasses that are largely intact and have been buried with sticks and debris.

Reports of cougar tracks and other evidence should be made to a local DNR office or by calling the department's 24-hour Report All Poaching line at 800-292-7800.

Cougars are classified as an endangered species in Michigan. It is unlawful to kill, harass or otherwise harm a cougar except in the immediate defense of human life. For more information about the recent cougar tracks and photo, call your local DNR office to report it or report it on our website. To learn more about cougars and how to identify their tracks, go www.michigan.gov/cougars .
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Cougar killed in Illinois

Postby Todd » Fri Nov 22, 2013 4:48 am

Cougar found in northwest Illinois

Posted: Nov 21, 2013 5:29 PM CST Updated: Nov 21, 2013 5:29 PM CST


WHITESIDE, CO., Ill. (Sun-Times Media Wire) -

Wildlife biologists will examine the remains of a cougar found on a farm near Morrison in rural Whiteside County in an effort to learn more about the animal's recent history and origin, the Elgin Courier-News is reporting.

An Illinois Department of Natural Resources conservation police officer on Nov. 20 responded to a call from a Whiteside County farm owner that a large cat had been seen leaving a cornfield in the far northwest Illinois county and running toward the farm owner's home and outbuildings, the agency said in a release. The officer went to the farm and after talking with the farm owner's wife and checking a horse barn and lot where the landowner's horses were located, he spotted the cougar in a concrete tunnel beneath a corn crib.

After consulting with the farm owner's wife and IDNR law enforcement and wildlife personnel, and at the farm owner's request, it was determined that the cougar should be euthanized. The officer dispatched the animal with his IDNR-issued rifle, the release said.

The cougar appeared to weigh more than 100 pounds and was 5-and-half to 6-feet in length. Wildlife biologists will take possession of the animal and conduct a necropsy, according to the IDNR.

Cougars, also known as mountain lions, were extirpated from Illinois before 1870 and are not protected by the Illinois Wildlife Code, the release said. There is no evidence that a resident breeding population exists in Illinois, but occasional transient cougars have been found in the state in recent years, likely dispersing from states to the west of Illinois, including South Dakota, it said.

There were three confirmed cougars in Illinois between 2002 and 2008. A male was killed by a train in Randolph County in 2002. Another male was killed by a hunter in Mercer County in 2004. A third male was shot and killed on the north side of Chicago in 2008. Although analysis indicates these three animals were genetically similar to mountain lions from South Dakota, their history in the wild is uncertain, according to the IDNR.

More recently, images taken by trail cameras in Jo Daviess County (September 2012) and in Morgan, Pike and Calhoun counties (October and November 2012) were confirmed by IDNR as showing a live cougar. Given the long distances typically traveled by cougars, and the proximity of the counties (especially Calhoun, Morgan and Pike), it is possible that the camera images may show the same animal, the release said.

There also have been unconfirmed reports of cougar sightings in Kane and DuPage counties in recent years.

Source: http://www.myfoxchicago.com/story/24038 ... t-illinois
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